Trending

No tags found
Tuesday May 24, 2022

Jackie Hammer Saki Iran, Ukraine When Washpost Lobs Makes Softball

If you can believe it, Saki marked the 200th episode of the show Wednesday (according to AP’s Chris Mejarian) and featured some interesting questions, including whether President Biden was a morning or evening person and a dazzling softball question about Fox’s Jackie Heinrich’s hardball. And Gray TV’s John Decker in the latest Biden White House Word game.

The Washington PostAshley Parker asked the embarrassing question about daylight saving time. It started as a success because he wanted the position of administration The Senate’s unanimous passage It’s a bill to make it permanent, which Saki says they do “No … at this point.”

Instead of stopping, Parker smiled at the follow-up: “Is the president more of a morning person or an afternoon person because people are often divided in this way, so I’m curious if …”

Saki played side by side, but softly spoke of his confusion:

That’s true. Now, to distinguish it from the specific question, he is an evening person, but I do not know what analysis you will give, but I look forward to reading tomorrow.

After some reporters, it was Jackie’s time and he made an argument that Saki said throughout the briefing that guns, missiles and other military equipment and firepower supplied to Ukraine in the war against Russia were and are not the only “defensive” weapons. “Offensive”

Ask him “Explain to us why the administration is provoking Mig and not provoking Javelin and Stinger,” Saki said straight up “Javelin and stinger are defensive weapons” Where “Migs are aircraft – offensive weapons, a different kind of military system.”

Heinrich went ahead, but fortunately Decker would draw Saki’s rage about this later.

Following an observation that the United States has said two different things about their mission in Ukraine, Heinrich simply dropped Newswatch on Twitter. Called often A “Jack Hammer.”

This time around, it was reported that as part of a new Iran nuclear deal, the United States would remove the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) from the Iranian military’s list of terrorist organizations (click “Expand”):

Henrik: And then, moving toward a nuclear deal, General Mackenzie told the Armed Services Committee that whatever he saw, the IRGC was a terrorist organization. Is the White House willing to remove the IRGC from the list of foreign terrorist organizations in order to reach an agreement with Iran?

PSAKI: We’re still in the discussion, so I’m not going to guess from here or outline what the final details will be.

Henrik: And perhaps they are responsible for launching missiles at US installations in Iraq. So, unless the Americans are being killed, is there no consequence, all in an effort to get a nuclear deal?

PSAKI: Again, you’re guessing at something that hasn’t been finalized. The agreement was not finalized. What I will note, and I will just go back to why we are discussing this deal, and at the moment we are discussing this deal because Iran’s nuclear gain threatens US interests. There is a need to take steps to contain it, which is why we are so closely engaged. And all of this is the result of President Trump’s withdrawal from the deal and Iran moving closer to achieving capability and acquiring a nuclear weapon and speeding up their breakout, so we’re here for the last president’s move, and the latest administration and it’s in our interest – it’s global interest, Iran. Refrain from acquiring nuclear weapons.

Decker – who spent six years on Fox News Radio before joining Gray TV, a local TV company – read a White House fact sheet on what was being sent to Ukraine and stopped briefing on a spicy note about how anyone could see it. Taken only as “protective” equipment: “100 grenade launchers, 5,000 rifles, 1,000 pistols, 400 machine guns and 400 shotguns. Are you saying that these items are not offensive weapons?

Saki presumably stuck to his talking points, just said “[t]Weapons that help the people of Ukraine fight against the aggression of a foreign country. “

Decker follows by surprise “[t]Hey, they can be used offensively, can’t they? ” But again, Psaki stammered.

This prompted the longtime reporter to say “yes” twice, although “you don’t want to say it.”[.]”

There was a cross-talk, but Decker hung up, saying he needed it “Finished … talking to me,” Which has incorporated reality “[i]Take Ukrainian … take[s] A Russian military official has been released with the weapons. It will “Aggressive in nature.”

However, Saki did not move on from insisting on his mistake because the whole thing was about “a difference that most people admit”.

To see the relevant briefing transcript, click “Expand”.

White House press briefing [via CBSN]
March 16, 2022
3:28 pm East

Jane Pisaki: I would note that the tools we provide are defensive, as you know, not offensive, and we see that as a difference. We are also watching –

David Sanger: But aircraft can be used for offensive purposes and anti-missile systems –

PSAKI: – Correct.

Sanger: Can’t you?

Pisaki: Exactly. Also – also, I note that the Department of Defense officials have also been evaluated which is the most effective. And while the Ukrainians still have a squadron of planes to use, I think any military officer can assure you that the kind of support we are providing today, including Stinger and other support for which we are increasing support, is exactly what we are. I think it is effective in war.

(….)

3:31 pm East

Ashley Parker: And, on a slightly lighter note, does the administration have a position on congressional efforts to make daylight saving time sustainable?

Pisaki: I saw those reports. I was trying to think of a joke. I couldn’t think of one. I have no specific – we, obviously, work closely and closely with Congress on all the legislation they consider, but I have no specific position from the administration at this time.

Parker: Is the president more of a morning person or an afternoon person because people are often divided in this way, so I’m just curious if …

Pasaki: That’s true. Now, to distinguish it from the specific question, he is an evening person, but I do not know what analysis you will give, but I look forward to reading tomorrow.

(….)

3:34 pm East

Jacques Henrik: Just one more. I know a lot of people have asked about Mig, but can you explain to us why the administration is not provoking the Migs and provoking the Javelin and Stinger?

PSAKI: Well, first of all, the Javelin and the Stinger are defensive weapons. Migs are aircraft – offensive weapons, a different type of military system. I would say another assessment that we’ve made, not through the White House or the President – from the Department of Defense, is to evaluate what works and what works on the ground in this war and that’s why we announced an additional $ 1 billion – 800 million today, but $ 1 billion in aid this week, using high-level military systems, stingers, javelins, counter-artillery, counter-mortar radar, anti-armor systems that we know have been effective and we know Ukrainians are trained. Third, the Ukrainian Air Force already has a number of squadrons of mission-capable aircraft, and giving them more will not significantly change their effectiveness. And, finally, I touched on it in the beginning, offensive versus defensive, but we also do a risk assessment from the Department of Defense on what will increase and that’s what we obviously want to avoid.

Henrik: And then, John Kirby says the success of the U.S. mission in Ukraine is an independent, sovereign, sovereign Ukraine. We have also heard that the official mission is to prevent growing outside Ukraine. Which one is this?

Pasaki: Both are true.

Henrik: If we are not sure what the desired result is, then how can we hope to be able to –

PSAKI: Why – why can’t both be true? A sovereign Ukraine and prevents them from extending beyond.

Henrik: All right. And then, moving on to the nuclear deal, General Mackenzie told the Armed Services Committee that whatever he saw, the IRGC was a terrorist organization. Is the White House willing to remove the IRGC from the list of foreign terrorist organizations in order to reach an agreement with Iran?

PSAKI: We’re still in the discussion, so I’m not going to guess from here or outline what the final details will be.

Henrik: And perhaps they are responsible for launching missiles at US installations in Iraq. So, unless the Americans are being killed, is there no consequence, all in an effort to get a nuclear deal?

PSAKI: Again, you’re guessing at something that hasn’t been finalized. The agreement was not finalized. What I will note, and I will just go back to why we are discussing this deal, and at the moment we are discussing this deal because Iran’s nuclear gain threatens US interests. There is a need to take steps to contain it, which is why we are so closely engaged. And all of this is the result of President Trump’s withdrawal from the deal and Iran moving closer to acquiring capabilities and acquiring a nuclear weapon and speeding up their breakout, so we’re here to thank the last president for his action, and the latest administration to stop Iran from acquiring nuclear weapons. In the interest – it is in the global interest.

(….)

3:44 pm East

Josh Wingrove: Going back to drones, what is your position that drones would not be considered an extension by the Department of Defense and would not be considered an offensive weapon?

PSAKI: Again, I have nothing more to confirm than what was in the fact sheet and there are precise details in it, but the defensive weapon we have given.

(….)

3:52 pm East

John Decker: You gave a list of all the military equipment –

Pasaki: Yes.

Decker: – Includes $ 400 million – $ 800 million

Pasaki: Yes.

Decker: – It is being given to Ukraine. Among these items, let me read them to you: 100 grenade launchers, 5,000 rifles, 1,000 pistols, 400 machine guns and 400 shotguns. Are you saying that these items are not offensive weapons?

Pisaki: These are the weapons that help the people of Ukraine fight against the invasion of a foreign country.

Decker: They can be used aggressively, can’t they?

PSAKI: Again, there are weapons – I’m talking about that – weapons that can –

Decker: The answer is yes, Jane.

PSAKI: – to be used by –

Decker: The answer is yes. I mean, even if you don’t want to say it, the answer to that question is yes. And so, obviously you’re trying to differentiate between offensive –

PSAKI: Well, what are we talking about –

Decker: – and defensive weapons.

Pasaki: – Let me finish. Let me finish

Decker: Well, let me finish –

Pasaki: Let me finish.

Decker: – Because I’m making my point –

Pasaki: Let me finish my answer.

Decker: And you keep – no. I’m finishing a point and then you can respond to my answer.

PSAKI: All right. Go ahead.

Decker: All right. You are making the difference between an offensive and a defensive weapon. Anyone who looks at the list of weapons I just mentioned will clearly say that they are offensive. If a Ukrainian military officer, or one of the enlisted persons, possesses one of these weapons, they may take out any kind of Russian military officer with these weapons. They are aggressive in nature, so why not provide the Ukrainian military with more offensive weapons like this?

PSAKI: Well, first of all we are providing different rifles, etc. There is a difference between a plane, and a plane and a huge military system. I think anyone should recognize this. And that’s what we’re talking about – giving rifles and pistols, many of them farmers and people living in the countryside for self-defense. I think there is a difference that most people can recognize.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Back to Top