Hayes: GOP should fight Trump instead of ‘al-Qaeda’ threat

In Thursday night’s episode, Dr. All with Chris Hayes On MSNBC, host Chris Hayes spent the opening part of his show in an attempt to sue the United States and the world over the threat posed by Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. . Hayes also suggested that former President Donald Trump, such as Russian President Vladimir Putin, Hungarian President Victor Urban, and “nationalist-populist forces push for Brexit.”

Hayes began his monologue with some semantics, but as always he eventually walked away: “If you move away from all the devastation that happens every day in Ukraine, it is impossible to see it as a moment of history. For the first time in 30 years since the end of the Cold War, we have seen the world change completely.” Hayes mentioned.

He took his viewers through American history after the end of the Cold War and the collapse of the Soviet Union, and commented on how “The former Soviet republics, including Ukraine, became virtually independent overnight. This signaled a major shift towards independence and democracy, and it ushered in an era between 1991 and 2001 when liberal democracy was largely unrivaled.”

The MSNBC host mentioned how after World War II and during the Cold War, “Politically, militarily and ideologically the main challenge to liberal capitalist democracy came from communism.” And after the end of the Cold War there a “Flow in the late 1990s, a clear sense of decay. There is no major struggle to challenge our way of life.” Everything has changed since the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks.

Hayes lamented the excessive response to 9/11 and accused former President George W. Bush of trying. “To frame those attacks and the war on terror that took place as a great undisclosed clash of civilizations. A war of existence for democracy and freedom.” He continued to attack former President Bush and the Conservatives after 9/11 in an attempt to keep America safe:

The conservatives and the Bush administration have greatly increased the importance of al Qaeda and, fundamentally, the ideological challenge they have raised. Honestly, it was insane to change the way we lived our lives to the kind of resources we had to fight them. We have spent trillions of dollars, lost thousands of Americans, not to mention the lives of millions of Afghan Iraqis. Sick of thinking about these harsh terms. And all of these people were clearly yearning for the great ideological war of World War II and then the Cold War. (…) In retrospect, it is clear that the fight against al Qaeda was not an era-defined global war for hearts and minds. There was no fundamental challenge to the global system or to liberal democracy as we know it. And that experience, the rush to frame things, as a kind of war of civilization, has made me very skeptical that it is a kind of framework for understanding global issues, a struggle for freedom versus oppression.

Instead, Hayes believes we are living in a dangerous moment where he claims that the Conservatives thought we were living after 9/11. “What we have seen over the last few years has been a move towards liberal democracy and openness among nations, a setback.” Hayes is upset. “We see this in Europe with the rise of Hungary’s Victor Urban, who proudly describes himself as a liberal democrat, and with the nationalist-democratic forces in the UK who push for Brexit.”

Then, of course, he named former President Donald Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin as the last two threats to democracy: “It’s happening here at home. Donald Trump, obviously, is an ambitious authoritarian who appreciates authoritarians and seeks to overthrow a free and fair election.”

This part of Chris Hayes made it possible by minimizing the al-Qaeda threat to launch a wide-ranging attack on Donald Trump. Infinity, Dove And Mercedes-Benz. Their information is linked so that you can tell them what kind of content they fund.

Click “Extend” to read the relevant transcript:

All in MSNBC with Chris Hayes
3/24/2022
8:02:05 pm East

Chris Hayes: If you move away from the daily devastation in Ukraine, it is impossible not to see it as an important moment in history. This is the first time in 30 years since the end of the Cold War that we have imagined that the world order is being transformed. I was ten years old when the Berlin Wall fell in November 1989. The beginning of the end of communism in Eastern Europe. I still remember the summer vacation when the failed Soviet coup of 1991 took place. The last breath of the Soviet Communist Party.

(…)

Hayes: That coup was defeated in a few days. The Communist Party collapsed. And within a few months, the Soviet Union collapsed. The former Soviet republics, including Ukraine, became virtually independent overnight. It marks a major shift towards independence and democracy, and it marks the beginning of an era between 1991 and 2001 when liberal democracy was largely unrivaled.

(…)

Hayes: Of course, after the defeat of the Nazis in World War II, the main challenge, politically, militarily and ideologically to liberal capitalist democracy, came from the communism headquartered in Russia. And the war between these two models of liberal democracy, capitalist democracy and communism through the Cold War has been going on for more than 30 years to determine the world order. 40 years. That struggle has defined our world for decades. But as Fukuyama puts it, with the fall of communism, the fundamental ideological challenge to the dominance of liberal democracy no longer existed. And so in the late 1990s, many had a clear sense of flow, a kind of decay. There is no great struggle to challenge our way of life, and then, of course, something happened. Happened September 11. And there was a mob, almost immediately, and I remember even in those days, the attacks and the war on terror that took place as one of the most defining conflicts of civilization. An existential struggle for democracy and freedom.

[cuts to video]

President George W. Bush: Tonight, we are a country that is on the brink of disaster and called for freedom. This is the fight of the world. It is a struggle of civilization. The struggle of all those who believe in progress and pluralism, tolerance and freedom.

Vice-President Dick Cheney: We have just completed a century where militant ideology was pushed back by the power of independence and democracy. Tonight we face that kind of threat again. And once again we will be the winners.

Secretary of State Colin Powell: It was an attack on civilization, civilization must respond.

[cuts back to live]

Hayes: That mentality was influential. Even hegemonic. It continues year after year. Indeed, in 2004, the then Democratic presidential candidate, John Kerry, faced a backlash for describing how he described what he thought would make Americans feel safe again. “We have to go back to where we were, where terrorists are not the center of our lives, but they are a nuisance,” he said. As a former law enforcement officer, I know we are never going to stop prostitution. We are never going to stop illegal gambling. But we’re going to reduce it. Organized crime is at a level where it is not increasing. It’s not threatening people’s lives every day and basically, it’s something you’re fighting for, but it’s not threatening the fabric of your life. ”

But in the end, I have to say and I felt that way at the time, but really now I feel that knowing what we know now, John Kerry was right. The conservatives and the Bush administration have greatly increased the importance of al Qaeda and, fundamentally, the ideological challenge they have raised. Honestly, it was insane to change the way we lived our lives to the kind of resources we had to fight them. We have spent trillions of dollars, lost thousands of Americans, not to mention the lives of millions of Afghan Iraqis. Sick of thinking about these harsh terms. And all of these people were obviously longing for the Great Ideological War of World War II and then the Cold War. They have gritted their teeth in this new fight, even though they were wrong, totally, about the opportunity. In retrospect, it is clear that the fight against al Qaeda was not an era-defined global war for hearts and minds. There was no fundamental challenge to the global system or to liberal democracy as we know it. And that experience, the rush to frame things, as a kind of war of civilization, has made me very skeptical that it is a kind of framework for understanding global issues, a struggle for freedom versus oppression.

But I must say, now, I think we’ve reached the kind of apocalyptic moment that people thought 9/11 was. And it closes the chapter on the kind of world order that Francis Fukuyama identified. The end of history after the end of the Cold War, liberal democracy ascended to its peak. What we have seen over the last few years is a move towards liberal democracy and openness among nations, a setback. We see this in Europe with the rise of Victor Urban of Hungary who proudly describes himself as a liberal democracy and with the nationalist-populist forces in the UK who push for Brexit. Of course, this is exactly what is happening in this house, Donald Trump, obviously, an ambitious authoritarian who appreciates authoritarians and seeks to invalidate a free and fair election. Still trying to do so and, of course, in Putin’s Russia, where his fascist ideology and wounded national pride have turned into a brutal attack on the battlefield.

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